Menu
Your Cart

Is the e-cigarette the cause of a fatal lung disease

In 2019, it seemed to go completely wrong with e-cigarettes in America. Dozens of deaths, hundreds of sick people and complaints from almost all states of people with lung complaints. The possible cause was quickly found in the use of e-cigarettes. But is the e-cigarette the cause of a deadly lung disease and how can this be explained?

What is going on

In August 2019, the first reports came from the United States about an inexplicable lung disease. Dozens of cases were reported from multiple states, the death toll would quickly rise to twelve. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention rang the bell, and this disease was soon associated with e-cigarettes. Nearly two hundred cases were reported with the same symptoms, by users of e-cigarettes in a period of just two months. The number would increase quickly, was there an epidemic?

Figures in perspective

After more than ten years there are around ten million users of e-cigarettes in the United States. Incidentally, under no circumstances can the causes of death be directly traced to the use of an e-cigarette. This is in contrast to the 450,000 deaths that cigarettes claim every year in the United States. Of course every death is one too many, so research is of great importance.

THC and oil

The complaints are probably a result of 'black market' e-liquids and home-made liquids based on THC and vitamin E acetate. THC is a substance in marijuana. This can be evaporated by dissolving it in an oil. Only oil vapors are life threatening because oil drops attach to the vesicles, which can lead to lung disease and worse. Other hazardous substances were also found in illegal e-liquids.

Is the e-cigarette the cause of a fatal lung disease

As a conclusion we can state that fumes do not cause lung diseases, as far as we know, provided that the products comply with the strict rules that apply in the EU. So no oil-based THC or e-liquids, but raw materials such as Propylene glycol (PG) or Vegetable Glycerin (VG).